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Plagiarism Prevention Guide: Terms to Know

This guide helps first year students how to avoid the pitfalls of plagiarism.

Terms to Know

Term

Definition

Citation

Indicates the source of a quote, paraphrase, summary or idea. Usually seen as an in text (parenthetical citation), endnote or footnote.

Plagiarism

The reprinting of another’s work or ideas and claiming it as your own. Something plagiarized never has a citation as to its original source.

Footnote

A source Indicated by a superscript number such as the number two²followed b followed by citation with the corresponding number at the end of the page.

MLA

Refers to a paper and citation format style published by the Modern Languages Association. Usually used by humanities and Englishclasses:

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/

APA

Refers to a paper and citation format style published by the American Psychological Association. Usually used by courses in the social sciences, natural sciences, and health sciences:

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

Citation style

A specific way to format a citation published by an organization or that has been codified in some manner. Common citation styles are APA, MLA, and Chicago

In-text citation

Sourced from which the quote or idea came from that is inserted in the text of your paper directly after the quote or your paraphrase of it. USUALLY THE AUTHOR OF THE SOURCE AND PAGE THE QUOTE OR IDEA MAY BE FOUND ON.

Self-plagiarism

Submitting a paper or part of a paper, or other written work in a course that you have previously submitted to another class and received a grade for.

Mosaic plagiarism

Taking, phrases, and paragraphs from a variety of sources and joining them together without careful documentation of their sources.

Citation management software

A software tool such as EasyBib and RefWorks you can use to store and organize your citations and to print out your refernces formatted in a style of your choosing.

http://library.laguardia.edu/home/index.php?/research/database/subject/citation_tools/

Academic integrity/honesty

Academic integrity is defined as honestly doing one's own academic work in compliance with assignment requirements and guidelines. Examples of academic dishonesty include cheating, plagiarism, Internet plagiarism, obtaining an unfair advantage, falsification of records or any official documents, and misconduct on internships.

Fabrication

Something that you have made up, even if you have provided a citation for it.

Paraphrase

A restatement of a quote or idea in your own words of a text or passage you found in a source. REQUIRES A CITATION.

Block quote

Long quotes (check the style guide that you are using for how to format). REQUIRES A CITATION.

Common knowledge

Something like a date e.g. The United States declared its independence from Great Britain in 1776 or a fact, e.g. Franklin Roosevelt was elected president four times, that most people know. USUALLY does not need to be cited OR ATTRIBUTED to a source.

End note

A source Indicated by a superscript number such as the number two²followed b followed by citation with the corresponding number at the end of the page.

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